Medical Device Regulations & Compliance

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

EU MDR and Clinical Evidence: What You Need to Know
EU MDR and Clinical Evidence: What You Need to Know

The Council of the European Union has adopted the European Medical Device Regulations (MDR 2017/745), which were published in the Official Journal of the European Union and entered into force on May 26, 2017. Are you ready?

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WHITE PAPERS & CASE STUDIES

  • How To Avoid Compliance & Timeline Risks When Selecting A Medical Device Supplier
    How To Avoid Compliance & Timeline Risks When Selecting A Medical Device Supplier

    Discover the 9 elements of a predictable quality system when evaluating CMO partners. Predictable quality shortens your time to market, reduces your compliance risk, and reduces risk to the patient.

  • How To Recognize Effective CAPAs And A Culture Of Quality
    How To Recognize Effective CAPAs And A Culture Of Quality

    When OEMs choose an outsourcing partner, they need to trust the effectiveness of the supplier’s CAPA program, and they need to trust that the supplier’s culture sustains quality each and every day, for every device.

  • OEMs: Do You Trust Your Medical Device Supplier’s Quality?
    OEMs: Do You Trust Your Medical Device Supplier’s Quality?

    As an OEM, it is your responsibility to ensure the parts supplied to you are compliant with ISO regulations. That is no easy task. Ideally, your supplier’s quality systems are strong enough to identify risks, prevent defects, and to catch defects quickly if they do occur. This requires a robust quality management system. When it comes to evaluating the quality systems of your medical device supplier, where do you begin?

  • Managing The Unpredictability Of The Product Development Process
    Managing The Unpredictability Of The Product Development Process

    How development teams need to engage in the holistic, programmatic risk management necessary for a predictable development program.

  • Incorporating Stress Into User Testing
    Incorporating Stress Into User Testing

    How do you design a usability test that mimics the panicked, stressful situation that a user may be in when he or she is using your medical device in the real world?

  • Are You Gambling With Medical Device Compliance?
    Are You Gambling With Medical Device Compliance?

    OEMs can ease their burden of ensuring CMO regulatory compliance by selecting a CMO with a fully integrated system for DHR creation. Not only can such a system eliminate the inaccuracies of paper records, but it enforces documentation and automates error prevention.

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ABOUT MEDICAL DEVICE REGULATIONS & COMPLIANCE

Medical devices, from ideation to post-launch assessment, are regulated in the United States by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the Medical Device Regulation Act of 1976 an subsequent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act of 1938.

The FDA’s medical device regulatory pathways — for premarket review, clearance, and approval — are based on three classifications, which indicate the degree of regulatory control necessary to ensure a device’s safety and effectiveness. Class I devices are considered low-risk, and many are exempt from the regulatory process. Class II devices require special controls for “labeling, guidance, tracking, design, performance standards, and postmarket monitoring,” and most require premarket notification 510(k) to demonstrate substantial equivalence (having the same intended use and technological characteristics) to a legally marketed device. Class III devices usually sustain or support life, are implanted, or present a significant risk of illness or injury. Most class III devices require premarket approval (PMA), which examines a variety of factors in weighing the probable health benefits from intended use of a device versus the probable risks.

Medical device makers must adhere to Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) regulations, which FDA inspectors use to determine if a manufacturer has the facilities, skills, and equipment to produce and pack its product. In addition, the FDA recently decreed that all medical devices must carry a unique device identifier (UDI), readable by both machines and humans, to “improve patient safety, modernize device postmarket surveillance, and facilitate medical device innovation.”

Medical device makers competing in international markets must monitor and adhere to the policies of foreign regulatory bodies, which can vary greatly, depending on the nation. For example, countries in the European Union all recognize CE-Mark approval, while the regulatory framework applicable to imported devices still is being built in growth markets like China and India.

Many global regulators require manufacturers to be certified by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ISO 13485 compliance, confirmed through third-party (notified body) audits, demonstrates a medical device manufacturer’s procedures and products meet or exceed international quality standards.

Efforts are also underway to standardize international regulations to ensure the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices. The International Medical Device Regulators Forum (IMDRF) — composed of regulatory agencies from Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Europe, Japan, Russia, and the United States — is building upon previous work by the Global Harmonization Task Force on Medical Devices (GHTF) to speed this harmonization and convergence.

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